What is the name of this chicken soup dish?

Joe
  • What is the name of this chicken soup dish? Joe

    I've been making this simple chicken soup dish for years. I learned it from my dad, who got it from my mother, and who knows how far back it went beyond that. But, I really don't know what its called. I'm curious because I'd like to look up similar recipes to get ideas on how to tweak it. We've always called it "goulash", but it doesn't look like the goulashes I've seen on the net.

    (Sorry about my terrible recipes. I never measure anything for this.)

    Soup:

    • A couple diced onions
    • 3-4 lbs of chicken (I usually use breasts. Not boneless or skinless!)
    • A bunch of paprika (I just make it nice and dark red)
    • 4-6 chicken bouillon cubes
    • Water

    Toss everything into a big pot. Bring it to a boil, and then let it simmer for a few hours. Try to get all the chicken bones out somehow at some point.

    Dumplings

    • some flour
    • some milk

    Mix together in proportions that make it good and gloppy. You dont want dough, or soup. When the soup is nearly done, drop large spoonfuls into the boiling soup. They'll be done when they start to float - maybe 10 minutes.

    Cucumber salad.

    • 1-2 peeled cucumbers, sliced very thin
    • a few large spoonfuls of sour cream
    • a bit of vinegar Mix together in a bowl. The sour cream/vinegar portion should have the consistency of thick milk. Cover and put in the fridge for a couple hours while the soup cooks.

    Serving: Ladle soup with a couple big dumplings into a bowl. Put a few big spoonfuls of cucumber salad into it. Eat it and smile.

    So, what the heck have I been cooking?

  • It sounds like Hungarian Chicken Paprikash. Basically is just Hungarian chicken and dumplings. Really tasty though.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&pwst=1&&sa=X&ei=PFVxTITfIcH58AaHlemMBg&ved=0CBYQvwUoAQ&q=hungarian+chicken+paprikash&spell=1

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