How should I deal with "thawed frozen puff pastry"?

Aquarius_Girl
  • How should I deal with "thawed frozen puff pastry"? Aquarius_Girl

    A cookie recipe asks for:

    14 ounces good-quality thawed frozen puff pastry, such as Dufour

    So, does puff pastry mean this? http://nishamadhulika.com/baking/homemade-puff-pastry-recipe.html

    Secondly, how long do I have to freeze that stuff?

    Thirdly, Google says that "thawed" means "Become liquid or soft as a result of warming".
    So, what is the way to make it soft?
    Do I have to add warm water and crush it?
    Or do I have to heat it in an oven?

  • No, you don't have to freeze it at all.

    The recipe you linked is indeed for puff pastry. It is rather tedious to create it, so it is available in supermarkets as a pre-fabricated food, just like pizza dough and other doughs. But it doesn't have a long shelf life in the fridge, so it is sold frozen. The recipe assumes that you will buy it frozen, and warns you to let it come to room temperature before you start baking.

    If you are making your own, the end product can be used in cookies immediately. Just pay attention to follow proper technique and work with a very cold dough and butter while making the puff pastry. The link you posted probably explains it - if not, search for better instructions.

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baking cookies puff-pastry
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