how to stretch white chocolate to make truffles?

Lysine Nation
  • how to stretch white chocolate to make truffles? Lysine Nation

    I have several bars of real white chocolate. The ingredients on the chocolate bars are, in the following order: Sugar, cocoa butter, milk, soy lecithin, vanilla

    There is no veg-oil listed in the ingredients (just so you know it's real chocolate)

    If I want to stretch the white chocolate, such as for making nutty or fruity truffles (or whatever), can I safely add something like this:

    1 c. sugar

    1 c. margarine (or 1/2 marg 1/2 oil)

    (and maybe some water for added moisture)

    My main priority is: Would the white chocolate harden enough?

    Please understand, it's not just because of wanting to stretch it, but also because I want softer, more luscious truffles, rather than just the firm, fatty white-chocolate.

  • More cream in your ganache will make a softer filling. You will need to experiment with the ratios to find the ideal consistency. You may not want to add sugar or margine to your your filling ganache, that is fairly unusual.

    If you are speaking of the coating for the truffles, or truffles without a coating, you really don't want to make them softer, because they simply will not be structurally strong enough.

    Note that if your ganache is quite soft, you may want to chill (or even partially freeze) it before dipping, so that it firmer and you can work with it. Assuming you are coating with true temperate chocolate, then the chocolate will harden even if at room temperature, the filling is quite soft.

Tags
chocolate
Related questions and answers
  • ' on cooking shows) unless otherwise qualified (eg, 'plain, strong flour') in which case it just means 'not self-rising'. Note that AP flour in the US South (eg, White Lily brand) tends to be softer than... from French meaning 'eat everything'). Mange tout (UK) also includes sugar snap peas (US). Peanuts (US, AU) may sometimes be sold in the UK as monkey nuts, especially if unshelled. And Peanut Oil may...) is dark cane sugar syrup (US, CA); corn syrup is an acceptable substitute (Farmhouse Cookery) rapeseed oil (UK) is Canola oil (US, AU). (abbreviation for "Canada oil, low acid") vegetable oil (US, AU

  • Flour-Free Baking" which had as ingredients: 140g butter, 215g sugar, 2 eggs, 75g ground almonds, 4 tablespoons of cocoa powder, 200g chocolate, 85 g walnuts, 1/2 tspn of vanilla essence and 50g choc chips. I adapted this by losing the sugar, replacing the choc chips with more walnuts and using pure "cacao" from this site: http://williescacao.com/fine-chocolate/products/ The result was quite nice... there's no sweetener. "Sugar-free" recipes on the net all seem to have something else - bananas/dates/sucrulose/apple mash. The recipe above is as sweet as I ever want it to be. Edit: the flour-free

  • something? Does the temperature of the coffee really matter? Here's the recipe: 3 cups flour, 2 1/2 cups sugar, 1 1/2 tablespoons baking soda, 1/2 tsp salt, 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, 1 1/3 cups vegetable oil, 1 1/2 cups buttermilk, 3 eggs, 1 1/2 cups freshly brewed hot coffee, 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract Slowly combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, salt and cocoa powder...I have a recipe for a chocolate buttermilk cake. It's not constructed like most cakes, but it's always turned out OK. I've always wondered what does the coffee in the recipe do? Is the coffee

  • with a strong smell (e.g. coffee) most chocolate can be used even after expiration date (only for private use of course). But what about chocolate bars - is it the same? I don't care about blooming, I just don't want the the chocolate goes bad before I can try them. ...The owner of a local chocolate store made me an offer I actually can't refuse: For a price that's really a bargain, I get one bar of every bar chocolate he as on stock - that would be about 40 bars

  • , then add to the pot. Add 1 cup fresh, chopped tomatoes. Slowly add 1 1/2 cups water. Add 1/2 tsp sugar, some salt, pepper, and I actually also added a dash of hot pepper sauce since it was so blah-tasting. Simmer for an hour. .... this is where I am now, and it's just.. blah, still. The next step will be to add 1/2 pound shrimp, a bay leaf, some fresh parsley, and cook for another 30 minutes. ...So, last time I made gumbo, I got the veggies chopped (onion, celery, green pepper, and garlic) and then realized I had prepped twice as much as I needed. I froze the extra ingredients, labeled

  • Storing white chocolate Brenda J. Thacker

    Possible Duplicate: How long can you keep chocolate, and what is the best way to store it? I just started using white chocolate to decorate dark chocolate covered cake balls. I used a squeeze bottle instead of the standard bag and it worked beautifully. I need to store the left over white chocolate though. What is the best way and how long will it keep? Thanks!

  • I have a family recipe for a to-die-for hazelnut torte with chocolate frosting. I want to bake it for an occasion coming up, but there will be at least two, possibly three people there who are allergic to chocolate. (No, none of them are related to each other. Just one of those things.) What sort of frosting can I make that will go well with the hazelnut, but which doesn't involve chocolate? The cake is pretty sweet — equal parts sugar and ground hazelnuts, plus egg whites — so I usually make a bittersweet chocolate frosting by combining a good half or two-thirds cup of dutch cocoa with 2

  • Possible Duplicate: Can I use Chocolate Chips in place of Semi-sweet baking chocolate? Can I substitute chocolate baking bars for chocolate chips? Usually the baking bars are so much more expensive. I am going to be melting the chocolate, so I'd figure chocolate is chocolate, right? However, I am worried about if when letting the chocolate set, if the results are going to be different or not (texture, shine, smoothness, etc). Thanks!

  • I got a deep fryer for Christmas, and that made me think of all the donut recipes I have seen floating about, like this one for crullers or this one for chocolate dipped donuts. These are just two examples, but I noticed they all call for a pot filled with about 2 inches of oil heated to a certain temperature. My deep fryer does have adjustable temperature settings, so that would be fine, but I am not sure if using the deep fryer instead of the pot of oil would work. Is a deep fryer an okay substitute? I really want to get some good use out of it, and this sounded somewhat plausible. Am I

Data information