Do nuts ever go bad?

amphibient
  • Do nuts ever go bad? amphibient

    I have some walnuts I found in the back of my cabinet that are probably 5 years old. The packaging says best if used by 2010. I tasted them and they taste alright, maybe a little tartish but I don't mind. I was wondering if walnuts and other nuts actually ever go bad considering that they are dry.

  • Yes, nuts are very fatty, and they will eventually go rancid— if this is the case, they will taste very poor. They can also dry out, or in more rare cases (especially if stored improperly) be infested with insects or molds.

    Generally, they should be good for six months to a year at their best flavor, depending on the variety (in the shell).

    Five years is a little long. I am not sure I would want to eat nuts that old.

  • Beyond obvious downsides like a rancid taste or textural deterioration, both tree nuts and peanuts are in a category of foods particularly prone to molds that produce aflatoxin, which can cause liver failure or liver damage in sufficient quantities.

    When I was importing a product from Asia that contained peanuts, it was one of the things that was considered a substantial risk, as it's a fairly common reason to initiate a recall if tests prove aflatoxin present in sufficient quantities to warrant concern. Certainly these molds are more prone to develop after extended long term storage, as mold growth is more likely over time.

Tags
storage-lifetime nuts
Related questions and answers
  • For convenience, I like to keep a variety of nuts on hand for cooking and baking. Is it possible to freeze nuts to keep them from going bad? Walnuts, Almonds, Pecans in particular.

  • chips. I adapted this by losing the sugar, replacing the choc chips with more walnuts and using pure "cacao" from this site: http://williescacao.com/fine-chocolate/products/ The result was quite nice... there's no sweetener. "Sugar-free" recipes on the net all seem to have something else - bananas/dates/sucrulose/apple mash. The recipe above is as sweet as I ever want it to be. Edit: the flour-free...I would like to make a chocolate brownie which has no added sweetener. It would be great if it were gluten-free as well, but that is less important. I tried a recipe from Dinah Alison's "Totally

  • I have gotten into the habit of buying raw or blanched or otherwise unroasted nuts from the local co-op in bulk and then oven-roasting or skillet-toasting on the fly for recipes. For most types of nuts it is either cost-saving or provides a tastier ingredient. In the course of doing this I have picked up a nasty habit of digging into my baking stash and oven-roasting nuts for ~ten minutes at about 400'F (typically in a dash of extra oil, salt, red pepper, paprika, garlic, etc) for a quick snack. So far walnuts and pecans have yielded tremendous results. Today I tried some raw almonds (whole

  • I'm going to make a pate using Painted Pony beans as a base. I want to add roasted walnuts, but I don't know whether basil and garlic would be acceptable to put to the dish. Would this make for a bad flavor combination? What further spices would you recommend incorporating?

  • I only prepare sushi rice a few times a year, so it takes me a while to go through even the smallest of bags. How long can I keep the bag for before it "goes bad"?

  • Unfortunately, wine will eventually go bad. The time this takes can vary from a few years to many decades, but most wines eventually will get there; and things can always be sped up by improper storage. The result of this is mostly associated with loss of good taste and / or development of bad taste. My question is if that's all, or if wine can also develop properties that can be bad for your health (apart from the health risks already associated with normal wine)? E.g. is it possible that wine gone bad can give you food poisoning or similar?

  • Possible Duplicate: Does kimchi go bad? I have some 'antique' kim chee in the back of the fridge. How can one tell if it is gone bad? Given that kim chee is fermented, it is hard to tell if it is no longer safe to eat or acceptable to offer to guests, say. Does aging improve the flavor? up to what point?

  • I made some hemp milk in my Joyoung the other day, and it smells like sulfur. It doesn't taste bad, but the smell is a little off-putting. Is this normal? Have I let my hemp seeds go bad? Should I filter it better?

  • I use a dish rack for air drying pots and pans. Unfortunately all of the dish racks I have ever purchased do not stand up to the abuse of pots and pans. Eventually the dish rack begins to break down or doesn't effectively drain water drips because the weight of the pots and pans is not equivalent to that of dishes. How do I go about selecting a drain rack which will hold up to pots and pans?

Data information