Would using milk powder better than fresh milk when poaching?

Jack
  • Would using milk powder better than fresh milk when poaching? Jack

    I read this question - What is the effect of poaching fish in milk? and was surprise that one can poach fish using milk.

    However, I was wondering if the milk will be spoil if it is continuous being cooked? And also would it be better if milk powder is used instead of just fresh milk?

  • Poaching is a gentle process - the milk isn't boiling so there is no risk of it burning or the like. It will of course not spoil in the sense of it going off, that's a totally different process.

    Fresh milk is better because, well, it's fresh. Powdered milk would probably work, but if you have fresh, use that.

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fish milk poaching
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