Why should I add salt to my curries?

Pureferret
  • Why should I add salt to my curries? Pureferret

    I've been advised by a friend of mine that I have to add salt to my curries if I want the spices to come out and not leave me with a bland curry.

    Now after being a doubter, as I never add salt to my food (for flavour reasons), I tried once or twice with various curries and after getting the amount right, it worked! I can kind of imagine the salt ions binding with some chemicals in the spice to aid it's solubility, but I'm not sure.

    Why is adding salt so important for curries? I've read this but it doesn't seem to say anything about spices.

    To clarify:

    • When I have added salt to my food as I cook that didn't have spices in (but did say have garlic, herbs, meat juices etc.), I haven't tasted a difference.
    • When I have made spiced meals (Curries, Tagines etc) with pre prepared spices and I've added salt I have noticed a marked difference.

  • Your experience with the curry is normal. Salt helps bring out and enhance existing flavors. This is true for everyone, as far as I know. Different people have different sensitivities, and want different amounts, but the effect is the same. Given that you thought the curry tasted better with it, I wouldn't be surprised if you should also be adding salt to other things - maybe just not as much as recipes typically call for.

Related questions and answers
  • ), Scallions (US), and green onions may not always be the same thing, but can typically be substituted for each other. (more details). Herbs, Spices & Seasonings: Kosher(ing) salt (US) is flaked..., likely to have allspice and possibly other similar spices. Either one may have ginger and cloves as well. Mixed spice may contain coriander (seed) or caraway. Baked Goods: Cookies (US, CA...) (although no one bothers to say the '™') liquidiser (UK) is a blender (US, CA) (Farmhouse Cookery). blender in AU refers to both a food processor and a liquidiser. skillet (US) is a frying pan (US, UK

  • I've taken a liking to the simple potato wedge as an alternate to mash potato when preparing meat and three vege. However, I'm trying to get a recipe that consistently deliveries tasty wedges. My current method is: Wash potatoes Chop potatoes place in plastic bag Add a little oil and spice mix* Shake Bake * The spice mix is the part I've been having problems with. I was using: 1 part salt 2 parts pepper 3 parts paprika But this wasn't giving consistent results. I've stuck with Nandos Peri-peri seasoning for a while as a safeguard, but I'd like to go back to my own spice mix. I'm

  • somebody sneezes a little too hard. After clearing the cheese blobs from my shirt and hair, I proceeded to scrape the remains (which was in fact the majority of what went in there to begin..., why this failed, but that only leads me to a deeper why which I have been unable to answer myself: Why did this happen with one of iSi's own recipes, found in the very recipe book that is included... the blade. The recipe actually says to use a blender or food processor but I assumed that a blender would be better. Should I have used a food processor instead, or maybe even a stick blender? Would any

  • fulling draining the pasta after boiling. Adding starchy pasta water to my sauce. The starchy water really brings everything together. You could say it thickens it, but not like a roux, as some have speculated--rather, the starch emulsifies the fats into the sauce (consider if I have, say, tomato sauce, cheese, and olive oil) and it also adds a rich mouthfeel. I've really had great success adding some of the starchy pasta water to the sauce and don't want to give that up. The problem is that when I've salted the pasta water, it means adding it to my sauce brings along all that salt--to the point

  • the last remove from heat and just before whisking in the butter, I needed a call of nature. When I got back the mixture had separated into what looked like curdled milk and an oily fat like substance. I tried just whisking the lot, but it refused to recombine, so I poured off the oil. The remaining substance (with a little oil) whisked fine when reheated slightly, so I added the butter and vanilla...I was making a butterscotch pie for the weekend, by following a recipe from the net. The ingredient list was 1 cup dark brown sugar 1/4 cup cornstarch 1/4 teaspoon salt 4 cups half

  • I froth my milk using the steam wand on my espresso machine. With a national-brand organic whole milk, I am able to get a perfect micro foam nearly 100% of the time. However, when I instead use...-by date). Perhaps there is some psychological effect going on and I am paying more attention to my technique now, though. If in fact this success is due to the aging, can anyone explain why? What... in both "pasteurized" and "ultra-pasteurized" forms. I'm not sure which one I usually get, but if I had to guess I'd say it's ultra-pasteurized (i.e., ultra-heat treated) because the national brand

  • I am trying to make a cheese soufflé to surprise my girlfriend on her birthday (24 Jan). After several cooking trials, I still face a key problem: my soufflé collapsed after baking for 25-30 minutes. What did I do wrong? Here are the steps to the recipe; boil equipment grease butter to the renakin, place into the freezer separate egg whites (no yolk mixed) add a little salt to egg whites add...: at 20mins: the soufflé raise about 3.5 to 4cm (from 5cm height renakin) around 25mins: it collapse about 0.5cm, so I immediately remove it from oven (T-T) after than it collapse very fast. (I guess

  • while other are white on the outside but inside they are coloured. I use a standard method: I cut 1kg chicken into 4-8 pieces, add 2 litres water, add salt, bring to boil, then simmer for 1 hour. On occasions I have managed to cook it all white but this is the exception not the rule. Does the size of pieces make a difference as to how well it cooks? Does size make a difference as to how I should... properly. Could it be the temperature? Even if I don't go above a simmer, it still doesn't cook properly. Does stirring make a difference? I have tried this, but it doesn't seem to. Do you have any

  • Not sure exactly how to ask this. I was looking for a Russian Chili Recipe, and being from Siberia myself I never really encountered it before. Therefore I took a traditional recipe and modified it a little to make it more like a Russian dish. Here is my recipe that I cooked for my company's chili cook-off. I want to hear some suggestions and opinions on this recipe. My question is: Has anyone..., making sure to continuously break up large pieces with a spoon or spatula. Once browned drain fat off of ground meat. Return the ground meat to the pot. Add onions and green bell pepper to the ground

Data information