What makes a torpedo roll unique

EDabM
  • What makes a torpedo roll unique EDabM

    In New York I've had assorted sandwiches on "Torpedo rolls". They are quite unique in flavor and texture unto themselves. I am a hobbyist baker and can't seem to figure them out. Anyone know what technique or ingredient makes them what they are?

  • In the midwest we have a few restaurant chains that serve torpedo sandwiches, aka gondolas---if they're similar to what you describe, they use sugar in the dough. You can find Avanti's bread recipes online; my family usually adds more sugar than what's called for.

Related questions and answers
  • with these, they are poblano-ish looking peppers with a purple-ish color to them; they have a subtle, sumptuous chocolate-y profile and pair very well with very hot peppers.) For example, I have made Chile Rellenos with them and they were very good; but recently I tried to incorporate them into a simple rice and eggplant dish and they didn't flavor the dish very well at all. I'm wondering if pre-roasting them ahead of time might have made them a better ingredient or if perhaps some other technique could have made them more worth including. What sorts of preparation techniques or ingredient combinations would

  • Possible Duplicate: Why are there so many different pasta shapes? What makes a pasta shape pair with a sauce? When getting ingredients for a soup recipe, I couldn't find the type of pasta the recipe called, so I just bought a spiral type pasta. It seemed to work fine in the recipe, but it got me thinking about pasta. Forgive my ignorance, but it seems like most pastas taste the same. The only thing that seems to make them unique is there size and shape; Is there any reason I should use one pasta over another if it is relatively the same size as the type of pasta a recipe

  • This is a Indian Sweat dish, there are many recipes on the internet. I need to know how would you prepare it, what would you add to make it taste unique? What will you do, to add a unique flavor to it?

  • A mille-feuille (or tompouce) is a pastry, consisting of layers of puff pastry with pastry cream in-between (see this if you don't know it). If you buy it in a pastry store, I find that the glazed top is unique for this pastry. Recipes online tell me that it's confectioner sugar and egg whites, but I think it's something else. It's solid, yet soft. You can see your tooth print in it. It's white and sweet. I can't exactly explain how it differs from regular egg white/sugar icing, but in my opinion it does. Does anybody have a clue what I'm talking about? Do you know what's

  • these recipes from friends with a broader audience than typing them into Microsoft Word. But how do I make sure I don't lose them? What else can go wrong?) ... that many truly unique recipes (yet!) my question is somewhat about principle...I just have been increasingly skeptical of lock-in like with Facebook and wanting to "take back my data". So despite... be in the same situation, so they can understand what they're getting into. So what I'm mainly interested in is making sure that any sites I join have fair licensing terms. Because websites

  • I've recently gotten into sunny side up eggs. I definitely like the top to be set up a bit, so I baste them in the hot cooking oil. I'm wondering what oils and fats people find best for this. So far... off pretty quickly and get back in the pan to heat up again (which is what I want). The others seem to stick on top of the egg a bit more, which makes it harder to keep getting enough fat in my spoon to baste them continuously. It's not that there's anything wrong with coconut oil, but I'm curious to try other methods. So what fat (or combination of fats) have you found most effective and delicious

  • Sometimes when making recipes that require just egg whites, I don't know what to do with the yolks so I just throw them out. Instead of throwing them out, is it possible to freeze them and keep them to use at a later date?

  • I read in Can raw eggs be frozen? that you can freeze eeg whites and use them later. I saw this suggestion about using an ice tray to make frozen egg white cubes (which makes it easier later on when you want to use a few eeg whites out of a frozen batch). My problem is, the frozen cubes won't come out of the ice tray! They seem to expand or for some reason stick to the tray very hard. I needed to melt them by running the back of the tray under hot water to get them out. Obviously I can't use any oil or anything like that in the tray to prevent sticking. Any suggestions?

  • What if anything makes a liquid a good candidate for a reduction? Often you see things like wines and fruit juices called to be reduced for recipes. Why are they so common? What specifics about them make them so? If I am wanting to play around with making different reductions is there anything I should look for and what are the expected results of the liquid having that content (i.e. high sugar content, does acidity levels have an effect on the reduction).

Data information