Can cultured buttermilk powder contain live cultures?

Flimzy
  • Can cultured buttermilk powder contain live cultures? Flimzy

    I'm looking for some buttermilk starter, which I know I can buy online, but I wanted to shop locally first. The two local health food stores don't carry it, so I checked one of the local supermarkets, and came across some Saco Cultured Buttermilk Blend, which is a dry powder. I'm curious if this can possibly contain live cultures, though. One forum post I found claims it does not:

    Because the SACO buttermilk is dried, it contains no live cultures and will not be a good buttermilk starter culture.

    However, many other living organisms, (such as dry yeast, and the freeze-dried Kéfir starter I found in the store today) come in dry form, so I'm not convinced that a dried product cannot contain live cultures, but maybe dried buttermilk is different. So is it true that this type of product does not contain live cultures, or will it work as a buttermilk starter culture?

  • It is true that Saco Buttermilk Blend contains no live cultures. If you can have any further questions, please feel free to call our consumer line at 1-800-373-7226. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about our product! Amy Verheyden Director of Consumer Affairs Saco Foods, Inc.

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