What does 'turn out' mean in bread baking?

Paul
  • What does 'turn out' mean in bread baking? Paul

    An instruction in this recipe says:

    Gently turn loaf out onto a sheet pan that has been lightly oiled and dusted with cornmeal.

    I am confused by the use of the words "turn out". Does this have some special meaning regarding bread dough? Or do they simply mean "take and put"?

  • All that is meant here by "turn out" is to take the mass that you have begun to mix in the bowl, and dump it all onto your (floured) counter to begin kneading.

    Turn out just means to dump. To move.

  • 'Turn out' simply means take the dough out of the bowl, nothing special involved. The 'turn' refers to the rotation involved in tipping (in this case) the bowl over.

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dough bread
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